Wednesday, March 14, 2012

THE BMA PRESENTS AFRICAN FILM FESTIVAL TRAVELING SERIES MARCH 24-25

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Experience the best in African cinema
African Film Festival Traveling Series
WHEN: Saturday, March 24 and Sunday, March 25, from 1 to 5 PM each day.
WHERE: The Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive, Baltimore
ADMISSION: Tickets are on sale February 22. A Single Day Pass is $10 (Free for BMA Members) and $5 for Students with I.D. Tickets are available in person at BMA Box Office, online at www.artbma.org, or by phone at 1-800-919-6272. Service charges apply to phone and online orders. For more information about ticketing, call 443.573.1701 or visit www.artbma.org .

Screenings of nine critically acclaimed short- and feature-length films are presented with English subtitles by directors from Algeria, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, and Niger. (Please note some content may be unsuitable for young children.)
The African Film Festival Traveling Series is organized by the African Film Festival, Inc. This series has been made possible by the generous support of National Endowment for the Arts, the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, New York State Council on the Arts, Lambent Foundation, and The Bradley Family Foundation. Special thanks to Mahen Bonetti, director, and Toccarra Thomas, program coordinator, African Film Festival, for their assistance and support.   
This program is sponsored by the BMA’s Joshua Johnson Council.
SATURDAY, MARCH 24

1 PM - Kinshasa Symphony
Picture 200 musicians playing Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony in the Congo! A fascinating look at the lone Congolese symphony orchestra that has persevered through war and other crises. This powerful film is about the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the people of Kinshasa, and the power of music. Directed by Claus Wischmann & Martin Baer, 2010, Democratic Republic of Congo/Germany, 95 min.
2:45 - A Screaming Man (Un Homme Qui Crie)
Adam, a former swimming champion, is a pool attendant at a hotel in Chad. When the hotel gets taken over by Chinese owners, he must give up his job to his son. Meanwhile rebel forces are attacking the government and the authorities demand that everyone contribute to the "war effort." Directed by Mahamat-Saleh Haroun, Chad/France/Belgium, 2010, 88 min.

4:30 - Lezare (For Today)
Lezare is a revealing and touching story about a homeless boy in a small village in southern Ethiopia. A powerful message—and beautifully shot film—about global warming and shortsightedness. Directed by Zelalem Woldemariam Ezare, Ethiopia, 2010, 14 min.
4:55 - One Way, A Tuareg Journey
This inspirational documentary chronicles a separated family’s slow, fractured emigration from Niger to Italy, as well as the adversity and opportunities they find there. Directed by Fabio Caramaschi, Italy/ Niger, 2010, 52 min.

SUNDAY, MARCH 25

1 PM - A Trip to Algiers (Voyage à Alger)
In 1962 a young woman lost everything during the war for independence in Algeria. A Frenchman who is leaving the country offers her and her six children his former home. Drama unfolds as an unscrupulous government official tries to take the home away from her.  Directed by Abdelkrim Bahloul, Algeria/France, 2010, 97 min.

2:45–5 - KONGO: 50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE (3 parts)
Kongo is a three-episode documentary series that focuses on the colonization of the largest country in Central Africa, the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

2:45 - Kongo Ep. 1: The Unbridled Race
The introductory episode retraces the first major phases of Congo’s colonial occupation through the eyes of French, Portuguese, Belgian, and African pioneers. The inner workings of this bloody conquest from slave trade to rubber trade encompass the Portuguese arrival in the 16th century through the height of King Leopold II’s sovereign kingdom in the 19th century. Directed by Samuel Tilman, Belgium, 2010, 52 min.

4:00 - Kongo Ep. 2: The Great Illusion
In 1908, under sharp criticism, King Leopold II reluctantly ceded the Congolese Independent State to Belgium.  Over the course of the next 50 years, both colonists and indigenes, each on opposite sides, build the Congolese “nation.” This second episode examines both European and African historical figures that shaped history through their ideas and actions.  Directed by Daniel Cattier, Belgium, 2010, 52 min.
5:00 - Kongo Ep 3: The Failed Giant
The voice of the third episode is Congo’s first prime minister, Patrick Lumumba, who was assassinated during the turbulent times of the independence movement. He passionately tells the story of his country’s history from 1960 until 2010, describing the challenges of building a nation upon the rubble left behind by colonial alienation. Directed by Jean-François Bastin and Isabelle, Christiaens, Belgium, 2010, 52 min.