Sunday, December 18, 2011

2 VISIONARY EXHIBITS NOW ON VIEW @ AVAM

J.J. Cromer, Detail: A Study of Passing EventsALL THINGS ROUND: Galaxies, Eyeballs & Karma

WHEN: October 7, 2011 – September 2, 2012
WHERE:  American Visionary Art Museum, 800 Key Highway, Baltimore

The American Visionary Art Museum's seventeenth annual, thematic mega-exhibition ALL THINGS ROUND: Galaxies, Eyeballs & Karma is a celebration and call to awareness of the circular and voluptuous nature of life. From the micro-atomic spin of electrons encircling a nucleus, to the macro orbit of planets rounding our sun, ALL THINGS ROUND delights in the curves, spirals, orbs, and bubbles of full-bodied beauty that playfully manifest throughout art, science, and beyond.

This wholly original art exhibition features the exuberant works of 70+ inspired, intuitive artists including: Scott Weaver's 100,000 toothpick wonder, "Rolling Through The Bay;" Adolf Wölfli's intricate mandala-like works; spherical sculptures of artists who are sight-impaired; and the micro dot sock-thread embroideries of Ray Materson. Don't miss Frank Warren's all-time best true karmic "PostSecrets;" the 3-D sacred yarn paintings of the Huichol Indians; and a cosmic tribute to cyclical notions of time – including an exploration into the fast-approaching 2012 Winter Solstice "end" of the Mayan Calendar!

Co-curated by Museum Founder & Director Rebecca Hoffberger and Mary Ellen 'Dolly' Vehlow – award-winning graphic designer & founder/sponsor of Washington, D.C.'s H Street Festival, ALL THINGS ROUND: Galaxies, Eyeballs & Karma is a lively circle dance with its visitors of all ages at its center!

Out Of This WorldOut Of This World
CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION OF EUGENE VON BRUENCHENHEIN
WHEN: Extended through March 2, 2012!

 

Eugene Von Bruenchenhein was born in Wisconsin on July 31, 1910. He lived in a small house in Milwaukee with his wife Marie, and he worked in a bakery. He was a self-taught artist, and believed he was capable of great things. His first paintings were on panels of boxes that he brought home from the bakery. Despite the fact that he was never successful in selling his work or gaining any recognition during his lifetime, his passion drove him to produce thousands of paintings, sculptures, and photographs. Since his death in 1983 he has been increasingly recognized as a uniquely important American visionary artist. (Above: No. 591 Creation in Vast Expanse of Luminos, May 1957)

This year, in celebration of the centenary of Von Bruenchenhein's birth, three major US museums are mounting solo exhibitions of his work, spanning the diverse media in which he worked. Because the peak of Von Bruenchenhein's visionary artistry is seen in his paintings, AVAM has chosen to present a selection of them. They come to us from the Von Bruenchenhein Collection. These and many more of his paintings are viewable over the Internet at vonbruenchenhein.com. Visitors to vonbruenchenhein.com may download high-resolution images of the paintings free of charge.

In the late hours, Von Bruenchenhein would sit at his kitchen table and let his imagination go. He applied paint to a board, and then moved the paint around. First, he used just his fingers. Then he began to scrape with combs, quills, bakery tools, and other objects. Most of his paintings were completed in a frenzy of activity that lasted one to three hours. The images are amazing for their dimensionality and detail, and for the worlds they reveal to us—so far removed from our own. By his own accounting, Von Bruenchenhein completed 1,080 paintings. When he died, his small house was crammed from floor to ceiling with them. These are some of his best.