Monday, October 24, 2011

PRINTS SPAN THE CENTURIES @ THE BMA

On View

Print by Print: Series from Dürer to Lichtenstein
October 30, 2011 – March 25, 2012
WHERE: Baltimore Museum of Art,
10 Art Museum Drive, Baltimore
443.573.1700
ADMISSION:
Free exhibition

The BMA’s world-class print collection is the inspiration for an unprecedented exhibition of works spanning 500 years of printmaking. Discover more than 350 prints by Canaletto, Pablo Picasso, Ed Ruscha, and other European and American artists who created series covering a wide range of topics— places, imagination, narrative, design, appropriation, and war. Also represented are two voices for a new generation of printmakers, Daniel Heyman and Andrew Raftery, who will speak at the BMA on Saturday, December 3.

DelaunayFrom Albrecht Dürer’s 16 woodcut illustrations for The Apocalypse (c.1496-1498) to Roy Lichtenstein’s seven Monet-inspired color lithographs Haystacks (1969), visitors will have the rare opportunity to experience multiple images in complete sets, as the artists intended. Other examples include Giovanni Battista Piranesi’s Imaginary Prisons, 1761 (16 etchings); El Lissitzky’s Figurines: The Three-Dimensional Design of the Electro-Mechanical Show “Victory over the Sun,” 1923 (10 color lithographs); and Ed Ruscha’s News, Mews, Pews, Brews, Stews & Dues, 1970 (6 color screenprints). More than half of the works in the exhibition have never been on view at the Museum. (Above: Sonia Delaunay. Plate 36 from the portfolio Compositions, Colors, Ideas. 1930. The Baltimore Museum of Art: Friends of Art Fund, BMA 1997.152.36. © L & M SERVICES B.V. The Hague 20110824)

The prints and themes were selected by students participating in “Paper Museums: Exhibiting Prints at The Baltimore Museum of Art,” a spring 2011 course at The Johns Hopkins University (JHU). Additionally, two students are working with the BMA over the summer to develop related educational materials for the exhibition.

The exhibition is part of a project supported by The Johns Hopkins University through a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.
The exhibition is sponsored The Rouse Company Foundation.